Tag Archives: heritage varieties

Potatoes

Potatoes in bloomThe potato harvest is in with varying results. We grew five varieties in 42l flexi tubs into which we sowed two seed potatoes of each. The final harvest was

  • Pink Fir Apple 6lb
  • Maris Piper 5lb
  • Kestrel 5lb
  • King Edward 3lb
  • Desiree 6lb

All the potato varieties yielded slightly less than those sown in the ground except the King Edward, which produced significantly less, although this plant sustained early damage during the spring storms. After drying the potatoes in the sun, they were stored in paper bags and placed in a cool, dark place until the potato tasting event later this month.

You can watch a video of our potato harvest here.

You can find more about the potato tasting event here

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Tomatoes

Green TomatoesEvery garden presents it’s own set of challenges that result from a combination of location, weather and growing conditions. Here in the mediated garden the tomato plants have developed a purple tinge indicating a lack of phosphorus. This can be caused by lack of feeding or cold soil. Phosphorus is essential for photosynthesis and overall plant and fruit health. To avoid this, include tomato feed when watering as an essential part of your routine. This is particularly important when using shop bought compost as it only contains enough food for six weeks.  Low temperatures which inhibit the uptake of phosphorus are more difficult to deal with. Plants can be helped by using mulches, surrounding pots with bubble wrap and positioning your plants in a sheltered sunny spot.

Beans

Growing alongside the main staple Scarlet Emperor Broad Beans you will find more unusual varieties such as Cosse Violette, Borlotto and Cannellino. Beans differ widely in flavour and colour are very easy to grow in containers and of course delicious to eat.
Cosse Violette are a French heirloom variety with dark purple pods and a delicate flavour. They produce beautiful purple flowers and masses of stringless beans. Being a heirloom variety you can produce your own seed ensuring a self sustaining supply. Allow some pods to mature and dry on the plant before storing them in a cool dry place for sowing next year.